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Steel chainlet flogger

Author: (c)2001 Tom

Yet another flogger which you can't buy in shops (photograph) - if you have tried my light rope flogger and leather flogger, this is yet another model. I will provide complete manufacturing instructions below, but it will not hurt you to read the flogger manufacturing instructions mentioned above.

This flogger is not suitable for beginners, as they "sting" even on the slightest touch. Moreover, individual chain links hit the skin independently of each other - there is no "thud" experienced with leather flogger, no stinging of tail ends. This flogger stings like hell, whole tails sting...You will notice that no stripes are left :-); sub's skin will become freckled instead.

Tails are made from nickel-plated chainlets (get them in a hardware store). Individual link is 4 x 8 mm in size. The chain is made of 1.2 mm diameter wire. You will need 3 meters of chain for nine stripes (33 cm each). I paid CZK 37 (GBP 0.8) per meter, which makes nice GBP 2.5 for the whole flogger. MAJOR FEATURE of this flogger: you can make the tail longer or shorter anytime you wish. Chainlet links can be connected or disconnected at will :-) What a pity that leather or rubber tails cannot be modified in such simple way... Do you imagine the possibilities? You can balance the flogger to your taste (weight of handle/tails, number of tails etc.).

Handle is made of light, but hard wood (get it in a hardware store: 1 1,5 m rods are sold for joiners who make furniture). You will buy cheap, hard, round rod, which can be sawed off to desired length. Contrary to lighter floggers described in the first paragraph of this text, please use at least 20 mm diameter rod - you will make shallow slots at one end to attach the chains.

Saw off desired length of handle (the flogger shown in the picture has 22cm handle), file the edges. Make a shallow groove (flute) some 3 mm from one end of the handle. The groove should be 2 mm deep (I used a rat's tail file and stopped when half of file's diameter was sunk in the wood). A wire will be threaded through (chain) tail ends and secured to the groove.

Attachment of (chain) tail ends to the handle: each tail will be inserted in a groove made in the end of the handle. Use a metal saw or tiny flat file to make the groove, which will be perpendicular to the groove which runs around the end of handle. Each tails goes to one groove, therefore you have to make a number of grooves equally spaced from each other around the perimeter of the end of handle (I decided for nine tails, but you can try seven, eleven...). First, mark the positions of grooves (imagine a child's drawing of Sun with rays) and then make grooves which are perpendicular to the groove which runs around the end of handle. The grooves should run at 45 degree angle relative to axis of the handle, starting in the peripheral groove and reaching some 3 mm towards the center of the end of the handle.

Having completed the grooves, thread a steel wire (I use stainless steel wire, 0.8 mm diameter) through the ends of (chain) tails, make a loop of the wire - you need a loop which has larger diameter than the end of handle and you need free ends (to secure the wire by twisting it tight later). Put the wire with tails onto the end of handle, tighten the wire loop a bit, push the (chain) ends to respective slots (it is easier than it seems, provided that you tighten the loop just right). Twist the ends of wire loop with pliers. Check whether all tails are in slots and the wire loop is in the peripheral groove. You can secure the attachment of tails to the handle with another loop threaded through already fixed tail ends and twisting it tight. The point here is not in attaching the tail ends with second wire, but in making slotted end of handle tighter.

You can paint the handle with (black) paint, but it looks better in leather. The instructions are the same as in previous flogger manufacturing instructions (see the first paragraph). For this text to be complete, I am describing the core technique here.

You can cover the handle with leather rectangle or helix. If you use a leather rectangle, just cut it to right dimensions (width equal to handle circumference and length equal to handle length). Helix is much nicer and durable. First, decide on how steep the helix will be (imagine the angle when viewing the handle from side). I decided for 45 degrees. To prevent spoiling a pretty big piece of leather, make a test strip from paper. The strip width should be 4.44 * handle diameter (the formulas are valid for 45 degree angle). Strip length should be (handle perimeter) times (handle length) divided by (strip width). Cut one end of the test strip in 45 degree angle. Wind the test strip around the handle. It is important to start by attaching the skew (cut) edge around handle perimeter, so that the first turn is formed. The ends of the skew (cut) edge should touch each other. Then continue by winding next turns, until you reach the other end of the handle.

When you get used to the technique and after you check the size of the test strip, cut identical leather strip and start over. Cover one half of the handle with chloroprene glue (or other glue suitable for leather). Cover half of leather strip with thin gluecoating. Start winding the first turn (starting with the skew edge laid next to the peripheral groove on handle. Edges of adjacent turns should cling to each other. After you reach the middle of handle, cover the second halves of handle and leather strip with glue and continue winding. There should be some remaining length of strip at the end of handle (leather is elastic and you will therefore have some length of the strip left). Cut the remaining leather off. Cut a leather ring and glue it to the end of handle.

Hint: you can glue a wire between turns. It hides the irregularity of winding and looks very pretty (imagine it: silver wire on black or red leather, copper wire on brown or white leather...). Moreover, the handle is easier to hold.

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